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Popular Treatments

Popular Treatments

Travel to the fascinating source where old and new coexist, as centuries-old spa and wellness traditions combine with innovative, unique treatments.

Acupressure

In this traditional Chinese pressure-point massage, fingers are applied to key points of the body to stimulate energy flow, ease muscle tension, relieve pain and promote relaxation. Often referred to as "acupuncture without needles."

Ashiatsu

In Japanese, the word translates as "foot" (ashi) "pressure" (atsu), although massage therapists also manipulate the body's pressure points with their elbows, hands, and knees. For this technique, balancing props are often used, such as ceiling bars, while sometimes the massage is simply performed on a floor mat. Different styles of barefoot massage have their origins in China, India, Japan, the Philippines and Thailand, and while ashiatsu is not found on most U.S. spa menus, Buddhist monks have practiced it for thousands of years.

Abyhanga or Ayurvedic Massage

This deep, therapeutic massage releases toxins and is extremely invigorating and relaxing. Specific massage oils are chosen to balance a person's doshas, which is the basis of the ancient Indian system of Ayurvedic medicine, a holistic healing option that incorporates nutrition, herbal medicine, aromatherapy, massage and meditation.

Balinese massage

A unique combination of techniques—such as palming, kneading, stretching and pressure-point massage with essential oils—define this popular, full-body traditional Indonesian massage that relaxes the muscles and mind. It is believed that in order to create true inner calm, there must be a good flow of blood and oxygen throughout the body. When blood and oxygen are flowing freely, then qi, or energy, will flow freely too. The exotic aromas and nourishing oils also help move the qi along.

Bamboo Massage

The unique combination of massage oil and heated bamboo tools allows therapists of this massage to give a deeper treatment. Bamboo is a sturdy, versatile plant found in abundance throughout Asia and has traditional significance in many countries, symbolizing strength of character, resilience, flexibility, honesty and simplicity. Tools vary in size and shape so they can easily be used to massage all areas of the body; longer sticks of various widths are used for gliding strokes while smaller tools can be used for more detailed work.

Bindi Herbal Body Treatment

This divine, ancient Ayurvedic bodywork ritual uses an aromatic blend of herbs and oils for exfoliation and light massage, and often winds down with a steamed towel wrap. The Bindi treatment not only eliminates dead skin cells, but also encourages detoxification and deeply calms the nervous system.

Himalayan Salt Scrubs

From the mountain range comes this delightful body treatment, where skin is rubbed with coarse salt, sometimes in combination with fragrant oils, to stimulate circulation and exfoliate the skin.

Reflexology

Introduced as zone therapy to the West in 1913 by Dr. William Fitzgerald, reflexology is based on ancient techniques that use pressure-point massage, usually on the feet but also on hands and ears, to restore the flow of energy throughout the body. Practitioners believe that areas on the feet and hands correspond to other zones throughout the body. Reflexology is also known to relieve symptoms of back pain, migraines, arthritis, sleep disorders, injuries and stress.

Reiki

Increasingly popular in the U.S., this spiritual Japanese healing technique involves practitioners laying hands on areas of the body to channel energy and promote deep relaxation, stress reduction and wellbeing.

Shiatsu

The Japanese translation is finger pressure. For this massage technique, a therapist applies pressure to specific points on the body to simulate and unblock meridians (pathways through which energy flows). Shiatsu is similar to acupressure, but it involves active and passive exercises and stretching. The therapist also diagnoses the patient as the treatment is in progress.

Shirodhara

This Ayurvedic treatment lasts seven to ten minutes, during which a stream of oil is poured onto the center of the forehead (or "third eye), helping with focus, concentration and relaxation of mind and body.

Thai Massage

The passive, yoga-like stretching and pressure-point massage along the body's major energy channels of this full-body technique releases blocked energy, relieves tension, aligns the skeletal structure and increases flexibility. It's traditionally practiced on the floor with the client wearing loose clothing.

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