Lessons for Spa Industry from Clinton’s “Health Matters” Conference

12 thoughts on “Lessons for Spa Industry from Clinton’s “Health Matters” Conference

  1. Pingback: Lessons for Spa Industry from Clinton’s “Health Matters” Conference | Spaster — Living Well, Spa life

  2. Kathryn Stolle

    Great comments, Susie. Caught snippets of the conference as it took place – mainly from a golf perspective and your tweets. Ground-breaking, in that it was so mainstream – and with the humanitarian Clinton (all politics aside) endorsing it, (not to mention all the other “greats”) the conference was bound to receive substantial positive attention. Lucky you to have been able to share and spend those valuable hours with Deborah!

    I agree – our industry needs to focus on a specific message and since the number one reason people go to spas is stress reduction, it doesn’t look like we need to dither about what that message should be. Don’t worry – we WILL continue to move closer to the integrative medical community – especially with http://www.spaevidence.com as a major resource – and I will do all I can to support you on this!!

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  3. Sonal Uberoi

    Dear Susie,

    Thank you for sharing such an important subject for the spa industry. Funnily, reading your post I too asked myself, why did they not call any figure from the spa industry to be part of the panel? I think that could be because they either do not see the spa industry as partner in the “prevention banner” or perhaps we as an industry do not advocate ourselves strongly enough under this banner.

    I strongly agree with you in that we need to put more time, energy and resources into helping spread the word about our work and how it can positively (and in a pivotal way) contribute to health systems. I also think we need to look at why, from the outside, the spa industry is not seen as a partner. Some reasons that come to mind are:
    – the somewhat ‘elitist’ label that we gave ourselves during the last decade
    – the somewhat ‘opulence’ of spas over the past decade with an accessible-to-the-privileged-few pricing policy
    – a business model that is profit based (nothing wrong with that, but more to do with the focus of the model) and not consumer-benefit based
    – education at all levels: as a spa consultant very rarely do I come across a spa that mentions the health benefits of their treatments. Therapists and spa managers can talk endlessly about what wonderful treatments they offer, the ingredients of the products, etc., but it is not often you come across spas talking about health benefits in the long run. Neither is their marketing based on any particular health benefits. I do however have to give a big congratulations to Massage Envy, Inspiritas Spa, Espa Life (amongst others) for doing things differently and joining hands with sister fields.

    Having said that, I do see the spa industry taking a step in the right step with initiatives like the Global Spa Summit where industry makers and shakers come together and help shape the future of our industry, and SpaEvidence.com, where we make available to the general public the numerous benefits of spa therapies.

    Best,
    Sonal

    Reply
    1. Deborah Smith

      Good discussion, agree with Sonal: elitist, opulent, fantastic settings — everything out of the ordinary. Why would our industry be considered a partner or answer to an everday problem of reducing stress?

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  4. Deborah Smith

    Sounds like a mixed bag of incongruent viewpoints, all competing for time. At least you were with Deborah.

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  5. Vanessa Stoessel

    Dear Susie,

    Thank you so much for sharing about your experience at this conference. I am now busily trying to load the videos so I can watch all the discussion panels. But it is through your blog that I came to know about it.

    Please keep up the great newsfeed – I enjoy all your updates on a monthly basis.

    Reply